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Zappa

Biggest wins alltime

I love seeing wins like Gate 32-0 over Penn State in Hamilton. I've been watching since as an infant in the early 50's, parents took me.
Some SU wins must rank up there, the 2003 blizzard wins over UMass and Western Illinois, the shutout over Rutgers in Hamilton in front of over 10,000 people around 1980 etc. Others ?
CR(colorlessraider)

I was at Umass and Western Illinois and Floridian Atlantic. Missed the big Penn State loss but was at Delaware debacle. Rutgers win was truly awesome.  What a great win for the boys!
Zappa

I watched the Florida game at the Hourglass with a standing room only crowd, we brought food in etc, it was unreal!
go'gate

Was at both blizzard playoff games in '03, unreal.  Electrifying, packed crowd at the Palace Theater in Hamilton to watch Colgate topple FAU.

And there has never been an effort to repeat that experience by the AD - for any sport - since.  Shameful.
Gate'83

Colgate 24 Temple 17, 1982... best game of my undergrad career.  Parents weekend, game was televised, temporary bleachers and lights installed for the overflow crowd of 4,000 (smaller stands back then!).  I was with my parents in the temporaries, Temple receiver who caught the last pass just out of bounds was right in front of us (he looked out from my biased viewpoint for sure).  That was the win that propelled us past BU in consecutive weeks, first on the road and then at home in the first round of the inaugural 1AA playoffs (played in a snowstorm the Saturday after Thanksgiving).  A great early 80's run for the Red Raiders...
CR(colorlessraider)

I made that one too.  Chilly day.  Always remember how fast the Temple players ran to the field house after the game was over!
Zappa

I was at all of them !
The Future

Western Illinois was the best game I've ever been to at any level. In terms of biggest wins, I think the playoff game against UNH this year was the biggest in a few decades because it marked a tipping point for the program. UNH has been the gold standard in the FCS in the northeast for 15 years. In previous playoff match-ups with UNH, there was an obvious disparity in size and speed--Colgate would get on a run and win the league and then get taken to the woodshed by a "real" FCS team. Last year's team was as good as or better than UNH physically. Hopefully that's a harbinger of more "biggest wins" in the near future.
go'gate

It was questionable that UNH even BE in the playoffs this year given their record.  Not to slight Colgate, but we didn't catch them having one of their best seasons.  If I recall correctly, someone at UNH was on the FCS selection committee...surprise. surprise.  We can't have the gold standard NOT make their record-10th postseason playoff appearance, after all.  Glad their season - and old stadium - ended on a sour note.  UNH has had the PL's number.

Were there any away games that were monumental events, like a win at Rutgers that anyone remembers?!
Gate'83

I'd agree on UNH not being up to previous standards... it was still a big win for us, got the CAA monkey off the back a little bit, and the UNH fans couldn't have been nicer or more complimentary of our team.  Glad we won, but no hard feelings about UNH!

Winning the championship at Lehigh in 2012 was very sweet.  Undefeated Lehigh team that had outclassed the rest of the league, we were losing at halftime... jammed it down their throats in the second half for Biddle's last championship.  Gate fans in attendance went on the field & celebrated with the team after the final gun.  That one was mighty nice!
go'gate

Agree with the thrilling PL championship at Lehigh!  Their cupcake record was misleading...and their absence from the playoffs proved it.  It was a lesson to us all.
Zappa

I went to Army in I think 1983, our  kicker kicked five field goals and we won  15-13. It was about 90 degrees, concessions stands actually ran out of water, soda etc. They were literally carrying fans out of the stands.
Gate'83

I was there for that one too, Zap.  Hosted a party back at my parents afterwards that went very deep into the night... remember my youngest brother, who was 14 at the time, wondering if my pals ever went to sleep!
The Future

I agree on UNH not being as strong as past UNH teams. As for them being in the playoffs, they were probably about as deserving as 6-5 Western Illinois--meaning neither would have gotten in most years. UNH though won't go down as one of the program's great wins but it (hopefully) shows the direction Colgate's headed.

Also, Mike Powers five field goals against Army still stands as the FCS record for most field goals in the first game of a career (might still be Div 1 record but couldn't find it).
Go...'gate

Gate '83, I think you are mixing up the 1982 Holy Cross game, which was televised by ABC at home before a sellout crowd on a beautiful October  afternoon (we won 21-17), with the Temple game about a month later, which was played on a bitterly cold day before about 4,000 fans (we won 24-17).  Both were great wins.

That 1977 Rutgers game, before a crowd that has been estimated at 18,000 (full stands in both end zones and standing room tix sold) has to be up there with Colgate's greatest wins, but 2003's run to the NCAA I-AA Championship Game probably is at the top.  Three wins in three weeks against the best that I-AA had to offer.....
Go...'gate

go'gate wrote:
It was questionable that UNH even BE in the playoffs this year given their record.  Not to slight Colgate, but we didn't catch them having one of their best seasons.  If I recall correctly, someone at UNH was on the FCS selection committee...surprise. surprise.  We can't have the gold standard NOT make their record-10th postseason playoff appearance, after all.  Glad their season - and old stadium - ended on a sour note.  UNH has had the PL's number.

Were there any away games that were monumental events, like a win at Rutgers that anyone remembers?!


42-0 at Rutgers in 1973, when Parr and VanEeghen ran wild and our defense completely shut down JJ Jennings, the nation's leading rusher (who would be co-MVP of the upstart World Football League a little over a year later).

14-9 at Garden State Bowl-bound Rutgers in 1978. RU was 9-1 going in (only loss to Penn State, which played Alabama for the NC) and Colgate was 2-8, rebuilding after the great 1977 season.  Bitter cold and windy day in New Brunswick but our defense was very stout and Marzo and Mancini produced sufficient offense to win.  ABC-TV and the NY Times called it the upset of the year in Eastern College Football.
'gate80

Biggest wins alltime

Catching up with the posts. I was at many of the games mentioned, will comment.

Colgate 31 - Penn State 0, 1932.   I was not at this game, but Penn State was weak in 1932. Much more impressive was Colgate's 7-0 win in their next game with the Nittany Lions, 9 years later in 1941, our 4th consecutive win over Penn State. That was only one of 5 Penn State losses over 4 seasons. PSU would finish 1941 with consecutive wins over Syracuse, West Virginia, Pitt, and USC.

Colgate 24 - Temple 17, 1982.   While wins over Army in front of 40,000 or Rutgers teams with gaudy records may have been sexier, Temple may have been the strongest team we beat since I was a student. They only had about a .500 record coming into the game, but played one of the strongest schedules in the country then. That year they had beaten Syracuse, shut out a Delaware team 22-0 that would go to the I-AA championship game, and routed Louisville and Cincinnati. The week before they lost to #17 ranked West Virginia on a long last second FG, and had also lost to #1 and #2 ranked Penn State and Pitt in games they were leading in the 4th quarter. Owls coach Wayne Hardin resigned after the loss to Colgate, and made some ridiculous comments Colgate fb fans would quote for years to come - "nobody, not Penn State or Pitt, controlled the line/ball the way Colgate did against us", or some such. I once suggested to Fred Dunlap that the Temple win may have been the best team he beat, but he disagreed, saying the Rutgers wins were against stronger teams. Who am I to disagree with Fred? But still I wonder...

Colgate 21 - Holy Cross 17, 1982.  Yes I think the poster is confusing this game with the Temple game. The HC game had the largest crowd at Kerr except for the 1977 Rutgers game, and portions were televised on ABC-TV (not the entire game since there was a rain delay during the AL championship series). Both the Temple and HC wins were top-25 all-time Colgate wins, IMO. Unfortunately they framed a 3-game losing streak against Rutgers, Syracuse, and Ivy champ Penn, caused in large part because the Colgate administration, petrified by the attention our fb program was getting, decreed they we couldn't go to the playoffs when we were ranked #1 in the country in our first year in I-AA. Even with the huge distraction, the losses to Rutgers and Penn were somewhat fluky. I have always wondered what would have happened that year if our administration had done what virtually every other in the country would have in our position (enjoyed the season!) Two out of 3 wins or even one would have made us a much higher seed in the playoffs and we could quite possibly have won the I-AA title in our first year in that category. Tiger Dunlap's book "The Dunlap Rules" sheds some light on this period, and unfortunately it confirms the worst we imagined about it.

To be continued...
'gate80

Biggest wins alltime

Colgate 15 - Army 13, 1983.   I was there, and yes it was hot as hell. I was doing a medical rotation in Manhattan at the time, and there was quite a build up and great deal of attention paid this game by the NY papers. Teams didn't start their seasons on Aug 29th like today. This early Sept game was a top Eastern match-up, perhaps the Eastern college fb game that weekend. Colgate had been named the top team in I-AA by Sports Illustrated a couple of weeks before, and was a slight favorite to win. We outplayed Army, but needed a late drive, including converting a couple of 4th and longs, to get into position for the winning FG. Mike Powers held the record for many years for most FGs in a first game by a freshman. He may still hold it. He made 5 out of 6 that day. He only made 3 FGs his entire high school career. While it was a fabulous win, I think the win over Army in 1987 was more impressive. Army turned out to have a weak team in 1983. They were much stronger in 1987, and we were 19 point underdogs. Both Army wins in the 80s were top-25 alltime IMO.

Colgate 35 - Lehigh 24, 2012.   Agree this was perhaps the best non-playoff win since 2000. The disgraceful forfeiture of home field against Wagner, resulting in an unexpected playoff loss, overshadowed this great victory. I actually think our 28-24 victory over Lehigh in 1999, also resulting in a PL title, was even better. This was Lehigh's only loss in 47 regular season games spanning 5 years, not including 3 playoff wins. I attended that game, where we came back from a 17-0 deficit.

Colgate 27 - New Hampshire 20, 2015.  I agree with posters that this was not one of Colgate's greatest alltime wins, as satisfying as it was. UNH was not that strong in 2015, and arguably should not have been in the playoffs. This was the only playoff win in the PL era that I expected (despite our loss to them during the season). The 44-38 win against James Madison the following week, however, was completely unexpected to me. IMO it is as good as any win in the last few decades since the Dunlap era. The game was close because of special teams; statistically we completely outplayed them. JMU has been a marquee team in FCS the last 10-12 years. They beat FBS SMU last year, and ACC champ Va Tech a few years ago, and of course won a national title about a decade ago.

Colgate 23 - Rutgers 0, 1977. IMO this victory is in a class by itself, the most impressive Colgate victory since FDR's first term. It is clearly a top-5 alltime win.  I agree with go 'gate that the 3 consecutive playoff wins in 2003 were our most impressive 3 straight wins ever.

Colgate 42 - Rutgers 0, 1973.  Colgate had lost to Rutgers by 30 the year before, and by 41 the year after. Mark van Eeghen ran for 259 years. In the decade from 1971-1980 Rutgers played Penn State, Alabama, Tennessee, West Virginia, Arizona State, Syracuse, and all service academies, among others. They were only shutout twice - 42-0 in 1973 and 23-0 in 1977, both to Colgate.

Colgate 14 - Rutgers 9, 1978.  We were 29.5 point underdogs. I think this was the biggest Colgate upset ever (any other contenders for this distinction?) Rutgers was 9-1 with their only loss a competitive one to top ranked Penn State. They had been publicly boasting all week that they would run up the score against Colgate to "payback" for the 1977 and 1976 games. For the second season in a row a loss to Colgate cost Rutgers a chance at a national rankings. This was only the 5th Rutgers loss over 3 years, with 2 to Penn State and 2 to Colgate. I got home in time to hear Dave Diles on the ABC college football scoreboard show call this game the biggest college football upset in the country that year.
Zappa

Great work, so fun to read and remember back. In 1977 the Rutgers game was particularly great because we got screwed on Thanksgiving in a nationally televised Turkey day game by official Jerry Markbreit who became head of NFL officials.  
Then Rutgers was our first game and we smoked them. 23-0
Bleachers were set up in the end zone, it was sold out, I can't remember any other soldout games in Hamilton. Just over 10,000 I believe, someone previously said 18,000 but no way could that happen.
BTW, before Rutgers beat us we were #20 nationally in D1.
Zappa

The Rutgers games were back to back, the loss was in 76 on Turkey day and the win was our opener the next year.
'gate80

The official who made the mistake was John Goldsmith. The supervisor of ECAC officials and Goldsmith himself publicly admitted the error:

http://www.si.com/vault/1976/12/13/626258/scorecard

The old Andy Kerr seated 12,500. The hockey grandstands were brought behind the endzones and added 2000-2500. We were squeezed into those seats like sardines (I arrived 2 hours early and could get no closer to midfield than the 30), and there were still many standing in the corners between the bleachers. Estimates of the crowd ranged from 15,000-18,000. Perhaps not as many as 18k but at the very least 16k, IMO. (The "official" attendance was the capacity of Kerr - 12,500.)

We were ranked #20 in the AP Div-1 poll later that season after our 9th straight win.
Gate63

1913 win at Yale put us on the map at the time. Yale went undefeated, untied, and unscoredupon in 1909 (10-0) and followed that up with 6-2-2, 7-2-1, and 7-1-1 records in 1910, 1911, and 1912. Started us on a run of 4 solid years under Coach Bankart that culminated in an 8-1 record in 1916. We went 24-5-2 from 1913-1916.

1932 win at Brown was the biggest of the year. Thanksgiving day. Sold out crowd. Last game of the season. Both teams undefeated. It was assumed that the winner would go to the Rose Bowl, but we all know how that turned out.
Zappa

Today Andy Kerr holds 10,221. There's no way the old bleachers held 12,500. It's larger now by far, might have held about 7500 back then. I was at the game and I'd bet you a cocktail the attendance was just over 10,000 even with the wooden bleachers brought in.
Steve

I will agree with Zappa. Even with the added bleachers beyond the south endzone towards what is now Beyer Small '76 Field there could not have been more than 10,500.

I was there too. What a crowd! A defensive battle par excellence. I remember well before the game started Rutgers coaches walking along the perimeter of the field, maybe having spotted the slight downward pitch on the east side towards the scoreboard endzone. Kinda scoping out their predicament at Andy Kerr. If you remember the 56-2 drubbing of Lafayette a year before you will remember that in hard rains a pond would quickly form there. (And so with the new turf field we have lost the advantage of mud bowl play expertise.)

Anyway, the defeat of Rutgers was terrific as the photo above shows. The smiles, backslapping and flying megaphone tell a great story. A perfect football weather day, too. We did not need any field advantage. We took it to them from start to finish. I would have loved to interview their coaches right afterwards.

Go 'gate!
'gate80

The media guides from the 70s and 80s say the capacity of Andy Kerr was 12,500. Would they exaggerate every year by 5,000? How could it have held more then? Well, the east stands extended to the end of both end zones, like the west stands do. Today they extend to about the 10 yard lines on both ends. Yes the Dunlap stands go higher, but being a crescent only between the 25-30 yard lines I'm guessing. Plus when they changed the west stands (thankfully) to aluminum from those splintery long wooden grandstands capacity was reduced. The added seating was not only the small grandstand that used to be behind the south end zone, but the hockey grandstands which were placed behind both end zones and which extended beyond the width of the football field.

Yes there were precious few times in our history when there were 10,000 spectators at Kerr. Some Ivy games (Cornell and Harvard?) had about 10,000. There were only 2 games where the attendance far exceeded this - the Rutgers game in 1977 and the HC game in 1982 (estimates for the latter game were between 14,000 and 15,000 present, though not being able to get off call I watched that one on TV). I'm not sure why the true attendance is unknown for these games (the official attendance was listed as the capacity of Kerr - 12,500). I think for the Rutgers game they let anyone in at the end who was willing to stand in the corners. Memories of game details fade after 40 years, let alone estimates of attendance. I'm basing the attendance estimates for the Rutgers and HC game on reports of the game I read at the time.
'gate80

Colgate fb 1913-1916

Colgate became a national power in fb in the years preceding WWI. Their most impressive victory was a 28-0 shutout of Brown to end the 1916 season. Brown began 1916 in Pasadena, playing Washington State in the Rose Bowl. That fall they won their first 8 games leading to the season finale against Colgate, outscoring their opponents 254-9, with 6 shutouts. They became the first team ever to beat national powers Harvard (21-0) and Yale (21-6) in the same year,, handing Yale (8-1) it's only loss. While Brown was the heavy favorite, Colgate was considered a strong opponent, entering the game with a 7-1 record. Earlier in the season Colgate handed Illinois its first loss in 3 years (15-3). The only blemish was 7-3 loss to highly ranked Yale, on a somewhat flukey TD late in the game.

The largest crowd in the first 36 years of Brown football were stunned to see Colgate completely dominate and crush the Bears 28-0. There is a cool panoramic picture of the crowd on a Brown website (http://dl.lib.brown.edu/pollard/atbrown.html) Final polls and historical computer rankings from 1916 I have seen rank Colgate in the top 3 (some #1), undoubtedly in large part because of the results of this game. Amazingly, there is no mention of this game in "A Roar From the Valley".
'gate80

Brown 1932

The 21-0 win over Brown was more than the biggest win of the year, it was the biggest win in our history. Brown entered the game undefeated, and every team Brown beat that year was undefeated at the time Brown played them, including a Columbia team the week before the Colgate game that would beat Stanford in the Rose Bowl the following year. According to historical computer rankings, we would only beat one team since 1932 that ranked higher than that Brown team (Tulane in 1934).

There was great nationwide interest in this game. NBC broadcast the game coast-to-coast with the premier radio broadcaster of the day - Graham McNamee - calling the play-by-play. The leading sport writers of the time, including Grantland Rice and Damon Runyon, were at the game. The Brown athletics website will tell you that portable grandstands were brought to Brown Stadium to accommodate the overflow crowd, and that a record 33,000 were present, a record that has stood 84 years to this day.

The first half was closely fought, with Colgate ahead 6-0 at halftime. Brown had marched to within the 1-yard line at the end of the half, but a goal line stand by Colgate preserved its unscored-upon season. Colgate dominated in the second half for a 21-0 victory. It was the third time in 16 years that Brown entered its Thanksgiving season finale unbeaten and untied, only to have a perfect season ruined by Colgate.
CR(colorlessraider)

Many thanks gate'80 for recapping those great games

I was at the Rutgers game in Hamilton, not Giant Stadium.  What a thrill!  There were charter buses up from New Jersey but full of Colgate fans!  We celebrated long into the night! Sure glad I was there.

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